MJA
MJA

Religion, spirituality and medicine in Australia: research and clinical practice

Med J Aust 2007; 186 (10): 45.

Studies demonstrating health benefits of religion are many and growing in number, and some claim the results are ripe for application in clinical settings.1,2 However, others argue that the research is not nearly as good or consistent as portrayed, and caution against acting rashly on inconclusive evidence.3,4 The goal of this supplement is to determine what this growing body of research means for Australian practitioners and patients.

Please login with your free MJA account to view this article in full

  • Harold G Koenig1,2

  • 1 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.
  • 2 Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.

Correspondence: koenig@geri.duke.edu

Competing interests:

None identified.

  • 1. Koenig HG. An 83-year-old woman with chronic illness and strong religious beliefs. JAMA 2002; 288: 487-493.
  • 2. Koenig HG. Religion, spirituality and health: an American physician’s response. Med J Aust 2003; 178: 51-52. <MJA full text>
  • 3. Sloan RP, Bagiella E, Powell T. Religion, spirituality, and medicine. Lancet 1999; 353: 664-667.
  • 4. Sloan RP, Bagiella E, VandeCreek L, et al. Should physicians prescribe religious activities? N Engl J Med 2000; 342: 1913-1916.
  • 5. Koenig HG, George LK, Titus P. Religion, spirituality and health in medically ill hospitalized older patients. J Am Geriatr Soc 2004; 52: 554-562.
  • 6. Glaser R, Kiecolt-Glaser JK. Stress-induced immune dysfunction: implications for health. Nat Rev Immunol 2005; 5: 243-251.
  • 7. Center for Spirituality, Theology and Health, Duke University Medical Center. Research on spirituality, theology and health. Latest research. http://www.dukespiritualityandhealth.org (accessed Apr 2007).
  • 8. Peach HG. Religion, spirituality and health: how should Australia’s medical professionals respond? Med J Aust 2003; 178: 86-88. <MJA full text>
  • 9. Williams DR, Sternthal MJ. Spirituality, religion and health: evidence and research directions. Med J Aust 2007; 186 (10 Suppl): S47-S50. <MJA full text>
  • 10. Eckersley RM. Culture, spirituality, religion and health: looking at the big picture. Med J Aust 2007; 186 (10 Suppl): S54-S56. <MJA full text>
  • 11. Wilding C. Spirituality as sustenance for mental health and meaningful doing: a case illustration. Med J Aust 2007; 186 (10 Suppl): S67-S69. <MJA full text>
  • 12. Rumbold BD. A review of spiritual assessment in health care practice. Med J Aust 2007; 186 (10 Suppl): S60-S62. <MJA full text>
  • 13. Winslow GR, Wehtje-Winslow BJ. Ethical boundaries of spiritual care. Med J Aust 2007; 186 (10 Suppl): S63-S66. <MJA full text>
  • 14. Jantos M, Kiat H. Prayer as medicine: how much have we learned? Med J Aust 2007; 186 (10 Suppl): S51-S53. <MJA full text>
  • 15. D’Souza R. The importance of spirituality in medicine and its application to clinical practice. Med J Aust 2007; 186 (10 Suppl): S57-S59. <MJA full text>
  • 16. Hopkins GL, McBride D, Marshak HH, et al. Developing healthy kids in healthy communities: eight evidence-based strategies for preventing high-risk behaviour. Med J Aust 2007; 186 (10 Suppl): S70-S73. <MJA full text>
  • 17. MacKinlay EB, Trevitt C. Spiritual care and ageing in a secular society. Med J Aust 2007; 186 (10 Suppl): S74-S76. <MJA full text>

Author

remove_circle_outline Delete Author
add_circle_outline Add Author

Comment
Do you have any competing interests to declare? *

I/we agree to assign copyright to the Medical Journal of Australia and agree to the Conditions of publication *
I/we agree to the Terms of use of the Medical Journal of Australia *
Email me when people comment on this article