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Allocation concealment and blinding: when ignorance is bliss

Vance W Berger
Med J Aust 2005; 183 (3): 165-166.

To the Editor: Forder et al conveyed that trials without allocation concealment have the potential to mislead.1 However, it is not true in any meaningful sense that “Without exception, allocation concealment is achievable in all randomised clinical trials.

Vance W Berger, Biostatistician
National Cancer Institute, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 6130 Executive Boulevard, MSC 7354, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
Article References: 
Reference Text: 
Forder PM, Gebski VJ, Keech AC. Allocation concealment and blinding: when ignorance is bliss. Med J Aust 2005; 182: 87-89.
Reference Order: 
1
PubMed ID: 
15651970
Reference Text: 
Berger VW, Christophi CA. Randomization technique, allocation concealment, masking, and susceptibility of trials to selection bias. J Mod Appl of Stat Methods 2003 2: 80-86.
Reference Order: 
2
Reference Text: 
Berger VW, Ivanova A, Deloria-Knoll M. Minimizing predictability while retaining balance through the use of less restrictive randomization procedures. Stat Med 2003; 22: 3017-3028.
Reference Order: 
3
PubMed ID: 
12973784
Reference Text: 
Berger VW. Quantifying the magnitude of baseline covariate imbalances resulting from selection bias in randomized clinical trials (with discussion). Biometr J 2005; 47: 119-139.
Reference Order: 
4
Reference Text: 
Berger VW. Selection bias and covariate imbalances in clinical trials. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2005.
Reference Order: 
5

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