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Amanita phalloides poisoning and treatment with silibinin in the Australian Capital Territory and New South Wales

Darren M Roberts, Michael J Hall, Morna M Falkland, Simone I Strasser and Nick A Buckley
Med J Aust 2013; 198 (1): 43-47. || doi: 10.5694/mja12.11180
  • Darren M Roberts1
  • Michael J Hall2
  • Morna M Falkland2
  • Simone I Strasser3
  • Nick A Buckley1,4

  • 1 New South Wales Poisons Information Centre, Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, NSW.
  • 2 Canberra Hospital, Canberra, ACT.
  • 3 Australian National Liver Transplantation Unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW.
  • 4 Professorial Medicine Unit, Prince of Wales Hospital, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW.

Correspondence: 1darren1@gmail.com

Acknowledgements: 

We thank Emily Diprose for helpful comments on this article.

Competing interests:

No relevant disclosures.

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