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Fraud in fluid resuscitation research

John A Myburgh
Med J Aust 2011; 194 (12): 621-622.
Published online: 20 June 2011

Research fraud is an unacceptable breach of trust

Few issues in medicine provoke the wrath of the profession more than research fraud. In an era when evidence-based medicine has become the cornerstone of information about the safest and most effective way to practise medicine, fraudulent or unethical medical research represents an unacceptable breach of trust for clinicians, health policymakers and the general public.

  • John A Myburgh1,2,3

  • 1 Division of Critical Care and Trauma, George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, NSW.
  • 2 Department of Intensive Care Medicine, St George Hospital, Sydney, NSW.
  • 3 Faculty of Medicine, St George Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW.


Competing interests:

I have received logistic support and an unrestricted grant, paid to the University of Sydney and the George Institute for Global Health, from Fresenius Kabi to conduct the Crystalloid Versus Hydroxyethyl Starch Trials. I have received reimbursement, paid to the George Institute for Global Health, from Fresenius Kabi for international travel to attend trial planning meetings and for a presentation at a sponsored meeting.

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