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Cruelty towards the family pet: a survey of women experiencing domestic violence on the Central Coast, New South Wales

Cheryl Travers, Andrew Dixon, Karen Thorne and Kaye Spicer
Med J Aust 2009; 191 (7): 409-410.

To the Editor: Pet abuse is considered another form of family abuse, and is a powerful marker for other forms of violence happening in the home. Women and children living with violence, isolated by their abuser, often form intense bonds with their pets.

Cheryl Travers, Public Health Officer1
Andrew Dixon, Health Statistician1
Karen Thorne, Programs Development Manager2
Kaye Spicer, Service Manager3
1 Public Health Unit, Northern Sydney Central Coast Health, Ourimbah, NSW.
2 RSPCA New South Wales, Sydney, NSW.
3 Central Coast Domestic Violence Court Advocacy Service, Gosford, NSW.
Article References: 
Reference Text: 
Loring MT, Bolden-Hines TA. Pet abuse by batterers as a means of coercing battered women into committing illegal behaviour. J Emot Abuse 2004; 4: 27-37.
Reference Order: 
1
PubMed ID: 
Reference Text: 
Ascione FR, Weber CV, Thompson TM, et al. Battered pets and domestic violence: animal abuse reported by women experiencing intimate violence and by nonabused women. Violence Against Women 2007; 13: 354-373.
Reference Order: 
2
PubMed ID: 
17420515
Reference Text: 
Volant AM, Johnson JA, Gullone E, Coleman GJ. The relationship between domestic violence and animal abuse: an Australian study. J Interpers Violence 2008; 23: 1277-1295.
Reference Order: 
3
PubMed ID: 
18326483
Reference Text: 
Flynn CP. Woman’s best friend: pet abuse and the role of companion animals in the lives of battered women. Violence Against Women 2000; 6: 162-177.
Reference Order: 
4
PubMed ID: 
Reference Text: 
Faver CA, Strand EB. To leave or to stay? Battered women’s concern for vulnerable pets. J Interpers Violence 2003; 18: 1367-1377.
Reference Order: 
5
PubMed ID: 
14678611

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