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Water recycling — forwards or backwards for public health?

Karin S Leder, Joanne E O’Toole and Martha I Sinclair
Med J Aust 2009; 191 (4): 238-239.

In reply: We agree that augmentation of drinking water sources with recycled sewage goes against the traditional policy of separating the two, and that many factors including cost and energy use need consideration in securing future water supplies.

Karin S Leder, Infectious Disease Physician1,2
Joanne E O’Toole, Research Assistant1
Martha I Sinclair, Senior Research Fellow1
1 Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC.
2 Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC.
Article References: 
Reference Text: 
Leder KS, O’Toole JE, Sinclair MI. Water recycling — forwards or backwards for public health [editorial]? Med J Aust 2009; 190: 293-294.
Reference Order: 
1
PubMed ID: 
19296807
Reference Text: 
National Water Quality Management Strategy. Australian guidelines for water recycling: managing health and environmental risks (Phase 2). Augmentation of drinking water supplies. Canberra: Environment Protection and Heritage Council, Natural Resource Management Ministerial Council, and National Health and Medical Research Council, 2008. http://www.ephc.gov.au/sites/default/files/WQ_AGWR_GL__Augmentation_of_Drinking_Water_Supplies_Final_2008_05.pdf (accessed May 2009, link no longer available).
Reference Order: 
2
PubMed ID: 
Reference Text: 
Natural Water Quality Management Strategy. Australian drinking water guidelines 6. Canberra: National Health and Medical Research Council, and National Resource Management Ministerial Council, 2004. http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/publications/synopses/eh19syn.htm (accessed May 2009).
Reference Order: 
3
PubMed ID: 

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