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Skin cancer: changing paradigms of practice and medical education

Christopher A Commens
Med J Aust 2007; 187 (4): 207-208.
Published online: 20 August 2007

As practice continues to evolve, there will need to be concurrent changes in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education on skin cancer

Over the past two decades, preventive health programs about the need for sun protection have alerted patients to the significance of increased rates of skin cancer in white Australians. Skin checks of both affected people and the “worried well” have become daily medical practice. This public demand has resulted in changes to medical practice and an increase in associated health costs, as touched on in two other articles in this issue.1,2 In this editorial, I argue that, as practice continues to evolve, there will be a need for concurrent changes in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education on skin cancer.

  • Christopher A Commens

  • Western Clinical School, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW.

Correspondence: ccommens@mail.usyd.edu.au

Competing interests:

Christopher Commens is a dermatologist and Chair of the Ethics Committee of the ACD. He was formerly Chief Censor of the ACD.

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