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Nutrition and Obesity

Children's television sub-standards: a call for significant amendments

Bridget P Kelly and Josephine Y Chau
Med J Aust 2007; 186 (1): 18.

To the Editor: Australia has one of the highest levels of food advertising on television in the developed world,1 with most advertisements being for foods that are high in fat, sugar, and/or salt.2 Evidence from international reviews suggests that television food advertising has an independent effect on children’s food preferences and purchas

Bridget P Kelly, BSc(Nutrition)Hons, Research Dietitian, NSW Centre for Overweight and Obesity, NSW Centre for Public Health Nutrition
Josephine Y Chau, MPH, BSc(Hons), Research and Policy Officer, NSW Centre for Physical Activity and Health
School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW.
Article References: 
Reference Text: 
Lobstein T, Dibb S. Evidence of a possible link between obesogenic food advertising and child overweight. Obes Rev 2005; 6: 203-208.
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1
PubMed ID: 
16045635
Reference Text: 
Chapman K, Nicholas P, Supramaniam R. How much food advertising is there on Australian television? Health Promot Int 2006; 21: 172-180.
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2
PubMed ID: 
16835276
Reference Text: 
Hastings G, Stead M, McDermott L, et al. Review of research on the effects of food promotion to children. Final report. Glasgow: University of Strathclyde, 2003.
Reference Order: 
3
PubMed ID: 
Reference Text: 
Institute of Medicine Committee on Food Marketing and the Diets of Children and Youth; McGinnis JM, Appleton Gootman J, Kraak VI, editors. Food marketing to children and youth: threat or opportunity? Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 2006.
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Reference Text: 
Carter O. The weighty issue of Australian television food advertising and childhood obesity. Health Promot J Austr 2006; 17: 5-11.
Reference Order: 
5
PubMed ID: 
16619929

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