Connect
MJA
MJA

Accessing health outcome data on high-cost medicines in Australia

Christine Y Lu, Kenneth M Williams and Richard O Day
Med J Aust 2006; 184 (8): 411-413.
Published online: 17 April 2006

Government-subsidised access to effective medicines in Australia is provided via the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). Decisions to subsidise medicines are based on assessment of cost-effectiveness (“value for money”) by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC).1 In effect, the PBS is “purchasing” health outcomes. As the majority of medicine use is publicly funded via the PBS, there is an obligation to monitor the outcomes to determine whether the expected health improvements are actually realised.

  • Christine Y Lu1,2
  • Kenneth M Williams2
  • Richard O Day3

  • 1 Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW.
  • 2 Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW.


Competing interests:

Kenneth Williams has been a member of the Advisory Board to the sponsor for adalimumab. Richard Day is a member of the Advisory Board to sponsors for adalimumab, infliximab, and anakinra in Australia. Kenneth Williams and Richard Day have also been contracted to undertake clinical trials of etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, and anakinra. Recompense for these activities was placed in audited hospital trust funds for use in the research activities of the Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW.

Author

remove_circle_outline Delete Author
add_circle_outline Add Author

Comment
Do you have any competing interests to declare? *

I/we agree to assign copyright to the Medical Journal of Australia and agree to the Conditions of publication *
I/we agree to the Terms of use of the Medical Journal of Australia *
Email me when people comment on this article

Responses are now closed for this article.