MJA
MJA InSight
MJA Careers
Editorials

Maternal deaths in Australia, 1997–1999

James F King, Emma K Slaytor and Elizabeth A Sullivan
Med J Aust 2004; 181 (8): 413-414.

Many maternal deaths in Australia are still preventable

James F King, MPH, FRANZCOG, FRCSC, Perinatal Epidemiologist1
Emma K Slaytor, MPH, BMedSci(Hons), Senior Research Officer2
Elizabeth A Sullivan, MPH, MMed, FAFPHM, Director3
1 Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne, VIC.
2 AIHW National Perinatal Statistics Unit, Sydney, NSW.
Article References: 
Reference Text: 
Slaytor EK, Sullivan EA, King JF. Maternal deaths in Australia 1997-1999. Sydney: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare National Perinatal Statistics Unit, 2004. (AIHW Catalogue No. PER24.)
Reference Order: 
1
PubMed ID: 
Reference Text: 
The National Institute for Clinical Excellence, The Scottish Executive Health Department, Department of Health and Social Services and Public Safety, Northern Ireland. Why mothers die 1997–1999. The confidential enquiries into maternal deaths in the United Kingdom. London: RCOG Press, 2001.
Reference Order: 
2
PubMed ID: 
Reference Text: 
World Health Organization Department of Reproductive Health and Research. Maternal mortality in 2000: estimates developed by WHO, UNICEF and UNFPA. Geneva: WHO, 2004.
Reference Order: 
3
PubMed ID: 
Reference Text: 
Mantel GD, Buchmann E, Rees H, Pattinson RC. Severe acute maternal morbidity: a pilot study of a definition for a near-miss. Br J Obstet Gynaecol 1998; 105: 985-990.
Reference Order: 
4
PubMed ID: 
9763050
Reference Text: 
Haynes K, Stone C, King J. Major morbidities associated with childbirth in Victoria. Obstetric haemorrhage and associated hysterectomy. Melbourne: Public Health Group, Department of Human Services, 2004.
Reference Order: 
5
PubMed ID: 

The full contents of this page are only available to subscribers.