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Clinical practice guidelines for communicating prognosis and end-of-life issues with adults in the advanced stages of a life-limiting illness, and their caregivers

Josephine M Clayton, Karen M Hancock, Phyllis N Butow, Martin H N Tattersall and David C Currow
Med J Aust 2007; 186 (12 Suppl): S77.

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  • Josephine M Clayton
  • Karen M Hancock
  • Phyllis N Butow
  • Martin H N Tattersall
  • David C Currow


Correspondence: 

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