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The weight of evidence suggests that soft drinks are a major issue in childhood and adolescent obesity

Timothy P Gill, Anna M Rangan and Karen L Webb
Med J Aust 2006; 184 (6): 263-264.

There is much to be gained by reducing children’s intake of soft drinks and little — except excess weight — to be lost

Timothy P Gill, PhD GradDipDiet, CoDirector
Anna M Rangan, PhD, GradDipNutrDiet, Nutrition Epidemiologist
Karen L Webb, MPH, PhD, CoDirector; and Senior Lecturer, School of Public Health
NSW Centre for Public Health Nutrition, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW.
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