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Universal human papillomavirus vaccination of Australian boys — neither cost-effective nor equitable

Peter D Massey and David N Durrheim
Med J Aust 2012; 196 (7): 446.
doi:
10.5694/mja12.10025

To the Editor: The possible extension of the Australian preadolescent female vaccination program against human papillomavirus (HPV) to preadolescent males is not a sensible use of public health resources.

Peter D Massey, Adjunct Senior Lecturer1
David N Durrheim, Professor2
1 School of Health, University of New England, Armidale, NSW.
2 School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW.
Article References: 
Reference Text: 
Chesson HW, Ekwueme DU, Saraiya M, et al. The cost-effectiveness of male HPV vaccination in the United States. Vaccine 2011; 29: 8443-8450.
Reference Order: 
1
PubMed ID: 
21816193
Reference Text: 
Kulasingam S, Connelly L, Conway E, et al. A cost-effectiveness analysis of adding a human papillomavirus vaccine to the Australian National Cervical Cancer Screening Program. Sexual Health 2007; 4: 165-175.
Reference Order: 
2
PubMed ID: 
17931529
Reference Text: 
Brisson M, Van de Velde N, Franco EL, et al. Incremental impact of adding boys to current human papillomavirus vaccination programs: role of herd immunity. J Infect Dis 2011; 204: 372-376.
Reference Order: 
3
PubMed ID: 
21742835
Reference Text: 
Palefsky J. Can HPV vaccination help to prevent anal cancer? Lancet Infect Dis 2010; 10: 815-816.
Reference Order: 
4
PubMed ID: 
21051294
Reference Text: 
Forouzanfar MH, Foreman KJ, Delossantos AM, et al. Breast and cervical cancer in 187 countries between 1980 and 2010: a systematic analysis. Lancet 2011; 378: 1461-1484.
Reference Order: 
5
PubMed ID: 
21924486

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